Monday, July 4, 2016

Tasty berries of some hardy epiphytic bromeliads

Small fruit of Aechmea gamosepala (left) & Quesenelia marmorata (right) which I sampled as food recently. The dark purple ripe fruit of the Aechmea was sweet, not outstanding in flavor but good. The Quesenelia was much milder and less sweet in flavor, but nice if you eat a lot of them, rather like custard. I was surprised to find the skin of both fruit is too tough to eat, you have to squeeze the flesh out with your teeth holding the skin with your hand, probably not a plus though possibly could become habit forming like sucking on a lolly. On the basis of this one sample it is hard to imagine these fruits having very much use except perhaps as novel but pretty average flavoring and colouring for things like ice cream. 

I decided to try the fruit largely on the basis of the article Bromeliads: Edible and Theraputic by Michael Spencer 1981 . Journal of the Bromeliad Society Vol XXXI (4). There is a specific reference to Quesenelia marmorata being edible, I don't believe I ever found a specific reference to Aechmea gamosepala fruit being edible, only general statements about the genus having edible fruit as well as virtually no reports of toxicity in bromeliads except in unripe pineapples.


Although these fruit do not seem to be very noteworthy food I think they are a small but positive addition to the edible garden because the plants can grow without soil as air plants or epiphytes, producing in niches where most, if not all, more useful crops could not, so don't compete with them for space. I grew these on the south facing side of a house in Wellington, New Zealand (hardiness zone 9)  where they only get late afternoon sun. They have tolerated winter night temperatures averaging around  + 5 C  with occasional frosts down to around  -3 C, possibly they survive because they do not get morning sun ( the sudden temperature change is often what kills tender plants).





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